Greg
Toppo

Non fiction writer

Greg Toppo is the national education and demographics reporter for USA Today. A graduate of St. John’s College in Santa Fe, N.M., he taught in both public and private schools for eight years before moving into journalism. His first job was with the Santa Fe New Mexican, a 50,000-circulation daily. He worked for four years as a wire service reporter with the Associated Press, first in Baltimore and then in Washington, D.C., where he became the AP’s national K-12 education writer. He came to USA Today in 2002 and in 2005 broke the Armstrong Williams “pay for punditry” story that launched a widespread look at government propaganda.

Toppo also co-led the USA Today team that in 2011 looked at educator-led cheating on standardized tests. The paper’s series prompted the Washington, D.C., inspector general to investigate high erasure rates in D.C. schools. Toppo was a 2010 Spencer fellow at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and is the author of the forthcoming book The Game Believes In You: How Digital Play Can Make Our Kids Smarter (April 2015). He and his wife have two grown daughters. They live near Baltimore.

Greg Toppo is the national education and demographics reporter for USA Today. A graduate of St. John’s College in Santa Fe, N.M., he taught in both public and private schools for eight years before moving into journalism. His first job was with the Santa Fe New Mexican, a 50,000-circulation daily. He worked for four years as a wire service reporter with the Associated Press, first in Baltimore and then in Washington, D.C., where he became the AP’s national K-12 education writer. He came to USA Today in 2002 and in 2005 broke the Armstrong Williams “pay for punditry” story that launched a widespread look at government propaganda.

Toppo also co-led the USA Today team that in 2011 looked at educator-led cheating on standardized tests. The paper’s series prompted the Washington, D.C., inspector general to investigate high erasure rates in D.C. schools. Toppo was a 2010 Spencer fellow at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and is the author of the forthcoming book The Game Believes In You: How Digital Play Can Make Our Kids Smarter (April 2015). He and his wife have two grown daughters. They live near Baltimore.

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What a wonderful and necessary book!

Sandra Tsing Loh
on The Game Believes in You

The Games Believe In You shows us how games can help all of us to be better learners, but even more importantly, it is a direct challenge to parents and educators to create learning environments our children deserve.

Rosalind Wiseman
on The Game Believes in You

As the parent of a young child, I began “The Game Believes in You” thinking of video games as a kind of menace. I finished it believing that games are one of the most promising opportunities to liberate children from the damaging effects of schools that are hostile to fun.

Kevin Carey
The New York Times Book Review on The Game Believes in You